Saturday, January 17, 2015

Cover Reveal: Wabanaki Blues by Melissa Tanaquidgeon Zobel







The Poisoned Pencil Cover Reveal
Title: Wabanaki Blues
Author: Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel
Publication Date: June 2, 2015        
Synopsis:
“Some days you appreciate the dead; others, you don’t dare think about them,” reflects Mona Lisa LaPierre, blues musician, high school senior, also known as the girl who never smiles. “But today is the last day of school, the day we remember Mia Delaney, the senior who never made it out of here alive.”
When her out-of-touch parents send her to the New Hampshire hinterlands to stay with Grumps, her reclusive grandfather, Mona is not exactly thrilled. She nevertheless slings her beloved guitar, Rosalita, over her shoulder, says goodbye to Beetle, the oblivious boy she adores, notes the parallels with Heidi (a book she never liked), and sets out to meet her destiny. Destiny pops up in various forms: a blonde bear name Marilynn with a fondness for bananas, a blonder boy named Del, and a metallic green motorcycle that was last seen racing away from her high school the day Mia Delaney disappeared eighteen years ago.
Mona’s search for Mia’s murderer becomes a quest for identity, love, and meaning. She is guided along the way not only by Grumps and his familiar but by her dead Grandmother, Bilki, whose spirit speaks to her in moments of need. As always, the journey is more important than the goal, and Mona’s journey is enriched by Native American traditions, a passion for music and art, and her growing realization that to achieve what is most important in her life, she must sacrifice what she most loves.   






      
About the Author:


Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel is the Medicine Woman of the Mohegan Tribal Nation of Connecticut. She received her MFA in Creative Writing from Fairfield University, her MA in History from the University of Connecticut and her BSFS in History/Diplomacy from Georgetown University. Zobel grew up giving tours at Tantaquidgeon Indian Museum on the Mohegan Reservation, learning tribal tradition from her great aunt, Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon whose life she chronicled ih the book Medicine Trail: The Life and Lessons of Gladys Tantaquidgeon (Univ. of AZ Press, 2000). Melissa has been employed by her tribe as a cultural leader for twenty-two years and has three grown children—Rachel Beth Sayet, Madeline Fielding Sayet, and David Uncas Sayet. She is married to her high school sweetheart, Randall Zobel.
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